Archive for the ‘distilled’ Category

Figure 1. De Kuyper Kirsch

Introduction

Holland, renowned for its cheese, flatness and wooden shoes, is home to De Kuyper Royal Distillers, the producers of those garishly-coloured, fruity liqueurs found in parents’ drinks cabinets around the world, often seen with a sugary crust around the cap (www.dekuyper.com, 2010).  De Kuyper started trading in 1695 and remains a family business to this day, and currently produces “over 70 different products”, most of which are extremely vividly coloured (www.dekuypercompany.com, 2010), in fact, colouration appears to be a large part of their marketing as their product range is displayed with corresponding colour of each liquor (www.dekuyper.com/liqueurs/, 2010).

The origins of kirsch, a colourless fruit brandy, are a little hazy, but production utilises a “double-distillation of morello cherries … including their stones”, and “about 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of cherries go into the making of a 750 ml bottle of Kirsch” (Wikipedia.org, 2010).  Perhaps the most well-known use of kirsch is as an essential ingredient in traditional Swiss cheese fondue recipes, but is also used in cocktails such as the Lady Finger (Wikipedia.org, 2010).

Aim

This experiment was designed to investigate numerous characteristics of De Kuyper Kirsch including, but not limited to, aroma, flavor, colour, satisfaction and vessel design.

Method

A 500 ml sample of De Kuyper Kirsch was collected from a local bottle store for NZ$36.00.  The bottle cap was removed under controlled conditions.  15 ml samples were decanted into clean ceramic vessels.  Aroma was evaluated by smelling the sample.  Flavour was analysed by tasting the samples and discussing results with a research collaborator at great length and, subsequently, satisfaction was assessed.  The bottle was held up to a standardized light to evaluate the colour of the liquor, and aesthetic aspects of the vessel were considered.

Results

The results for De Kuyper Kirsch are shown in table 1 below.

Table 1. Characteristics of De Kuyper Kirsch

Characteristic Result
Aroma Strong scent of nail varnish remover with a suggestion of sweetened almonds verging on the marzipanesque
Flavour After the initial, harsh alcoholic burn has dissipated, synthetic  cherry flavour comes to the fore which recedes leaving a distant fruity aftertaste
Colour Clear, colourless liquid
Satisfaction Drunk as an undiluted spirit (40% vol.), satisfaction is limited by the subject’s ability to resist the urge to dilute the spirit with an alternative substance such as orange juice or carbonated lemon beverages
Vessel Design Tall, sleek, elegant, clear glass bottle which is adorned with a simple, two-colour label in cream and maroon (see figure 1)
Drinkability 3

Conclusion

The study revealed that, while cherries are generally regarded as delicious, after double-distillation much of this delectability disappears in De Kuyper Kirsch.   Furthermore, De Kuyper Kisrch is somewat disappointing in that it lacks the vibrant colours of other beverages made by the distillery.  While it is beyond the scope of this study to evaluate the best use of De Kuyper Kirsch, the researchers suspect that Swiss cheese fondues may be the most efficient (and tasty) method of disguising the harsh alcoholic burn associated with consumption of the undiluted liquor.

References

http://www.dekuyper.com/

http://www.dekuyper.com/liqueurs/

http://www.dekuypercompany.com/

http://www.freedrinkrecipes.com/cocktails-drinks-recipes/ladyfinger-drink-recipe.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirsch

Figure 1. Jinro Chamisul Original

Introduction

Korea has a long and proud heritage of making alcoholic beverages, called soju (소주), from rice, but in recent years, rice has been substituted by other starchy products such as potato, sweet potato, tapioca, wheat or barley (Wikipedia, 2010).  Jinro (진로), a distiller in South Korea, was founded in 1924 and is the world’s largest manufacturer of soju.  Jinro’s soju products are sold under the name Chamisul (참 이슬), which, according to Wikipedia (2010) means “real dew”.  The English version of the Jinro website elucidates the method, by which Jinro Chamisul Original (20.1% ABV) is processed, and that the use of “affluent minerals” and the “bamboo charcoal refinement method” results in “a clean taste while boasts biorhythmic cells by providing pure minerals [sic]”.

Aim

This experiment was designed to investigate numerous characteristics of Jinro Chamisul Original soju including, but not limited to, aroma, flavor, colour, satisfaction and vessel design.

Method

A 360 ml bottle of Jinro Chamisul Original soju was sampled from a local bottle store for NZ$8.50.  The bottle was refrigerated for four hours prior to opening to ensure the temperature of the sample did not exceed 6oC.  The bottle cap was removed under controlled conditions.  The contents of the bottle were decanted into a clean shot glass and two small tumblers.  The sample in the shot glass was designated as the control.  Mango juice was added to the first of the other samples (sample 1) and cranberry juice was added to the second other sample (sample 2).  The juices were added in ratios of 3 parts juice to 1 part soju.  Aroma was evaluated by smelling the control.  Flavour was analysed by tasting the control and samples and discussing it with a research collaborator at great length and, subsequently, satisfaction was assessed.  The glass was held up to a standardized light to evaluate the colour of the liquor, and aesthetic aspects of the vessel were considered.

Results

The results for Jinro Chamisul Original soju are shown in table 1 below.

Table 1. Characteristics of Jinro Chamisul Original soju

Characteristic Result
Aroma Industrially distilled spirit with a sweet undertone
Flavour Control: Complex, fruity notes that intensify in sweetness after time

Sample 1: Reminiscent of mango juice with harsh alcohol added

Sample 2: Strong, sour berry notes with alcoholic hints

Colour Control: Clear

Sample 1: Thick, orangey-yellow liquid

Sample 2: Clear and deep red

Satisfaction Control: Strong alcohol content makes it difficult to appreciate the true flavours of the product

Sample 1: Much better than the control

Sample 2: Sour berry and unforgiving alcohol results in a nasty aftertaste

Vessel Design The label (see figure 1) is cream and green and exhibits an image of bamboo, doubtlessly relating to the bamboo charcoal filtration method used in the production.  The front label has an image of the company frog which is cream at room temperature and turns blue when cold (see figures 2 and 3 respectively)
Drinkability Control: 3

Sample 1: 5

Sample 2: 2

Figure 2. Jinro frog at room temperature

Figure 3. Jinro frog at 6 Celsius

Conclusion

Jinro Chamisul Original soju has displayed adaptability by improving on the control sample due to addition of foreign substances in sample 1.  It is not recommended that the product is utilized in close proximity to cranberry juice due to severe interference of flavours.  “Biorhythmic cells” may have contributed to this adjustment in flavour, but it is beyond the scope of the current study to confirm this hypothesis.  The highlight of the Jinro Chamisul Original soju experience was mixing fruit juices with the product in an attempt to enhance the drinkability and trying to make the temperature-sensitive frog label change colour.

References

http://english.jinro.com/product/product_domestic.asp

http://www.jinro.com/product/product_01.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soju